By in Food

How to Oven Roast Bell Peppers

I was elated to receive fresh bell peppers from my son's garden. These were some of the largest I had ever seen -- meaty, firm, and mostly of the red variety. I had 15 of these large beauties and knew I'd need to find a way to preserve them so they didn't go to waste.

Bingo! Roasting these lovely bell peppers and then freezing them in portion sizes for the future made the most sense to me.

How To Roast Bell Peppers in the Oven :

  • Wash peppers and dry them well.
  • Set oven temperature to 400 to 425 degrees F
  • Leave the stems intact for now -- it will make things easier later on
  • Place in a shallow pan or on a lipped cookie sheet
  • Brush olive oil (or your oil of choice) on all surfaces
  • Place the pan or cookie sheet into the oven
  • Monitor the bell peppers as they roast, turning them as needed to attain the amount of char you want -- or don't want.
  • The size and meatiness of the bell peppers will determine how long the roasting process will take.
  • When bell peppers are to the doneness you desire, remove them from the oven

Now, what to do with your roasted peppers? I allow them to cool enough that I can handle them without getting burned. As they cool, you'll see that the skin begins to crinkle in places, separating itself from the meat of the pepper.

You can use your roasted peppers just the way they are, or you can remove the skin and inner seeds. I prefer to remove the skin and seeds because later, when using the roasted peppers in cooking, some of those pieces of skin will come lose.

The easiest method I've found for removing the skin and seeds from the peppers is to:

  • Have an empty bowl over which you'll work.
  • Start with the stem, pulling and twisting it gently to remove it. Many of the seeds will be attached to this portion as you remove it.
  • There will be some liquid inside the pepper from the roasting process. You can either discard it with the skin and seeds or save it to use with the meat of the peppers
  • Open the pepper and remove any seeds that remain
  • Now you can begin to remove the skin. Find a loose edge and gently pull it away from the meat of the pepper.

In no time at all, you'll have delicious roasted, skinless bell peppers to use in your favorite recipes.

What are some of the ways you use bell peppers when cooking? Do you have a different method for roasting them?

This post is one of my entries for the A-W Category Challenge initiated by Dawnwriter .

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Image Credit » Photo taken/owned by Deb Jones 11-5-2014

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Comments

SLGarcia wrote on November 6, 2014, 2:34 PM

That sounds easy enough for a non-cook like me to do. I love peppers. My Mom used to make stuffed bell peppers when I was a kid, one of my favorite meals.

Feisty56 wrote on November 6, 2014, 3:03 PM

I really enjoy the flavor of the bell peppers -- more so the orange, yellow and red more than the green ones these days. I enjoy using the roasted peppers on sandwiches for an extra bit of mild flavor -- and nutrition.

MegL wrote on November 6, 2014, 3:03 PM

They look delicious. Only one problem, I don't think they would survive long enough to get frozen. I would probably eat them straight from the oven!

Scorpie wrote on November 6, 2014, 4:18 PM

Fill them with beef and rice and fried onions and do it right!

imphavok wrote on November 6, 2014, 5:46 PM

Love roasted peppers! I like the way you roast them, I'll have to give it a try.

bestwriter wrote on November 6, 2014, 8:15 PM

Everyone who grows fruits and vegetables seems to have this problem - how not to waste the bumper crop. This seems a good idea. May be i can try that with fruits in my garden.

carmela wrote on November 6, 2014, 9:17 PM

i tried roasting them directly on stove fire. sometimes when were using charcoal for cooking i just put them on hot charcoal!

Crin wrote on November 7, 2014, 12:04 AM

Or you may put them on the grill and turn them around when they are ready on one side. I place them in a cover pot with some salt sprinkled on them for a while and let them steam themselves in. Then the skin pills off very easily.

Madcanman wrote on November 7, 2014, 5:18 AM

This sounds wonderful. Seems like a fairly easy method, and I'd like to give it a try sometime. I've learned to enjoy the taste of peppers more, and all vegetables in general.

MarshaMusselman wrote on November 7, 2014, 11:36 PM

This sounds great, Deb. When I saw that you wrote ab out roasting bell pepper, I assumed you were talking about green ones. I'm not sure that we call the colored ones bell peppers too around here, but I've not paid that good of attention even though we sell them every day almost. So, if you remove the skins, then does it really matter how charred the skins do get, or if a person gets them extra charred does the charring penetrate the skins to the meat of the pepper too?

I enjoy stuffed green peppers, but I guess I've never had roasted peppers. I also wouldn't have clue how to include them in recipes. I'm hoping you'll share ideas on how to use them too, eventually.

Did you know that the red peppers are good for arthritis? Course, I think you have to eat a whole bunch of them at one sitting for them to do much good.

Feisty56 wrote on November 8, 2014, 12:56 AM

If you put a good char on the skin it will penetrate to the meat of the pepper. Grilling them would be great for that extra flavor, but I don't have a grill right now, so the oven has to suffice.

Maybe the peppers colored other than green aren't called bell peppers...I just assumed so since they look just like the green ones. Now I am feeling a little silly for making such an assumption. But you can roast the green peppers this same way.

haze wrote on November 8, 2014, 3:22 PM

I can't wait to try this. It sounds easy and good.

chatombreux wrote on November 8, 2014, 5:23 PM

We use ours almost exclusively to make chili. But, I have occasionally stuffed them, so pre-roasting wouldn't do for that. I usually just cut them up into dices and freeze them in freezer bags.

AliCanary wrote on November 8, 2014, 10:57 PM

Great tips! I love the red ones, and they are WAYYY too expensive to waste.

paigea wrote on November 9, 2014, 3:51 PM

I really like roasted peppers and usually use them for soup.

celticeagle wrote on November 10, 2014, 3:06 AM

They are good! I love stuffed bell pepper with hamburger and sausage mix and rice, with some tomato sauce and herbs added. Yum!

Ruby3881 wrote on November 10, 2014, 11:23 AM

I find it easiest to cut the peppers in half and remove stems, seeds, etc. before roasting. Skin comes off really easily if you let the roasted peppers sit in a covered bowl until they cool. The humidity is locked in, and it makes the skins really easy to peel off.

Ruby3881 wrote on November 10, 2014, 11:27 AM

Marsha, I made a wonderful roasted pepper soup last month from a mix of green peppers and coloured ones. I believe I put the recipe up on Bubblews. Maybe that's another candidate for migration.....

Ruby3881 wrote on November 10, 2014, 11:29 AM

They really are expensive, aren't they Ali? The coloured ones run us about $5/lb here, whereas we can usually get green peppers for about $1-$2/lb.

Ruby3881 wrote on November 10, 2014, 11:34 AM

We use bell peppers in just about everything! I love them in chili, stir fry, salads, and crockpot meals like Italian sausages and peppers. And my Katydid eats them like apples emoticon :smile:
We don't have space to grow them so I have to buy at the grocery store. We rarely have more than we need!

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:25 PM

Ah yes, some of mine didn't survive to make it to the freezer. : )

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:27 PM

I make what I call a version of Spanish rice, using ground turkey, the peppers, rice, onions, garlic, chili powder, cumin and Ro-Tel (diced tomatoes and green chilis).

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:27 PM

I hope you'll enjoy them. I've not been disappointed yet.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:28 PM

I don't see it as a problem -- more of a happy dilemma. I don't know why this method wouldn't work with fruits, too.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:29 PM

If I had a grill, that would be my preferred method for roasting.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:30 PM

Both those methods would work well. If I owned a grill, that would be my preferred method.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:32 PM

I really enjoy the flavor and texture of peppers, more so the red, yellow and orange to the green, but they're all good.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:32 PM

I vote for migration of that recipe for sure!

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:33 PM

It is easy enough and I think you'll be pleased with the outcome.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:35 PM

Like Ruby3881 , I use peppers in a number of recipes. They add color and an extra zing.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:37 PM

The reds are my favorite of all and don't want to waste a bit of them, that's for certain.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:39 PM

Mmm, mmm. soup with roasted peppers is yummy.

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:40 PM

Stuffed peppers are so good. When my kids were young, they'd only eat the stuffing, so I got extra peppers to eat. : )

Feisty56 wrote on November 10, 2014, 12:41 PM

Thanks for these extra tips. When you cut the peppers in half first, do they hold in the liquid from the pepper as it roasts?

Ruby3881 wrote on November 10, 2014, 7:17 PM

I love them all, but I find the reds have the most flavour and sweetness :)

celticeagle wrote on November 10, 2014, 7:32 PM

Oh really?! Kids can be so funny about vegetables can't they? Peppers are so pretty with Christmas colors and all. hehe

VinceSummers wrote on December 17, 2014, 10:41 AM

This sounds great. You may want to wear plastic gloves when de-skinning and de-seeding, so you don't introduce microbes, which takes away the sterility the roasting imparted. Nice,